Tree Radar: What Is It & How Does It Work?

Scanning Tress at Underground Root Level

Could you possibly imagine a world without trees? Most likely not! Apart from being aesthetically beautiful, trees play a critical part in both local as well as the global environment. You may have heard the saying that trees are like the lungs of the earth. This is because they can help to combat climate change since they absorb carbon, and in return they release oxygen. This is carried out through the process of photosynthesis. So, if you come to think of it, in your city or village, trees have a role at providing more purified air, as well as diffusing noise, reducing pollution, providing sustainable drainage, and improving the landscape.

However trees need to be taken care of. And apart from taking proper care of our trees, it is also important that when evaluating them, this is carried out professionally. Tree evaluations are a key part of arboricultural management. A consultant will need to have specialised investigation equipment so as to provide the most suitable and sustainable solutions for treescapes, which can sometimes be quite challenging. Tree Radar is a type of equipment that is non-invasive. It is a root locator and also carries out decay scanning. When hiring an arboricultural specialist you should make sure to check if they utilise tree radar equipment for their surveys and evaluations. A professional company will make use of this technology as it is the top one at present.

Crown to Root Tree Inspection. Image credit: Westchester Tree Life

Crown to Root Tree Inspection. Image credit: Westchester Tree Life

The main aim of any arboricultural management service is to promote the health of trees. With tree stock assessments and management plans, coupled up with any suitable maintenance and replacement techniques to ensure tree health and form, such a company can help in the proper care and supervision of trees.

The Tree Radar is a type of ground penetrating radar which is known to be the best way to investigate tree roots and tree decay. The best and most accurate results can be achieved without being invasive or disruptive in any way. In fact Tree Radar is the leading tree investigative tool because it can manage to detect sub-surface infrastructure even through concrete or tarmac. It is effectively the most cost effective yet accurate equipment available for these types of evaluations. It is also very fast as it collects data on the electromagnetic differences that can lie between strata below the ground, and artefacts. This enables one to determine both the depth as well as the precise location of the tree roots, along with any other items buried beneath the ground. This could include pipes, ducts, and cables among others. This data is then recorded in the tree survey field computer at the site. Survey findings are then interpreted to make recommendations and proper decisions.

When using Tree Radar it is also possible to determine the health of the vegetation without disruption in any way. Any sub-surface infrastructure will also be safe. Tree root mapping, or root morphology can be detailed, and root zone conditions are made available too. As a result this information can simplify the decision making process relating to any installations or developments that may need to be carried out at a site. These could include construction works, installation of services etc.

Tree Radar. Image credit: Design with Nature

Tree Radar. Image credit: Design with Nature

Tree Radar is also very helpful to ascertain any decay problems. It is a totally non-invasive way of surveying a tree for possible decay. Arboricultural specialists use Tree Radar to assess the likely risks of a tree’s structural integrity as a result of decay. With the use of electromagnetic waves it will be possible to determine the different properties of sound wood, and decayed wood. These can then be mapped on a radargram. Decay present high in the tree canopy, or in the main bole, or buttress roots can also be found.

Tree Radar can interpret radargrams as well as identify any voids. These underground badger runs can generally be attributed to a number of soil disturbances and so it will be possible to draw up on this information and make the necessary decisions to avoid additional problems.

Tree Radar has been improving ever since it was introduced and it is also used in Kent tree surveys and investigations. To date it is considered to be the best method for such studies and investigations.